Comprehensive drug & supplement sites

“Drugs and Supplements”

MedlinePlus, National Library of Medicine
Look up information on prescription drugs, OTC (over-the-counter) medications, & supplements by brand or generic name. From “Related Topics” in the right-hand column, you can link to extensive information on many common classes of these products (e.g., statins, cold & cough medicines, vitamins) and using drugs safely.

DailyMed

National Library of Medicine
Enter the exact, full name of a prescription or OTC drug to read the FDA’s currently approved label information, in a more readable form than the package insert.
NOTE: Your doctor may prescribe drugs for uses not approved by the FDA. “Off-label” use is legal, common, and may be helpful, but can also raise concerns.

Drug Information Portal

National Library of Medicine
Information about a specific drug or supplement can be located on multiple U.S. government websites with a single search.

“Information for Consumers”

FDA | U.S. Food & Drug Administration
Much useful information in a less-than-ideal interface.

Worst Pills, Best Pills

A drug dictionary & several excellent consumer guides are available for free. Expert, independent information on 1,800+ drugs and supplements is available with an inexpensive subscription.

Prescription drugs

“Drug Research Information”

CenterWatch
Information about newly approved drugs, drugs in development, and participating in clinical trials of drugs.

NeedyMeds

Money-saving tips, discounts, & ways to obtain drugs at no cost.

Supplements (vitamins, minerals, herbs & botanicals, enzymes, antioxidants…)

“Frequently Asked Questions”

Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health

“Herbs & Supplements”

In MedlinePus, National Library of Medicine
An extensive list of herbs and supplements, with information about each substance’s effectiveness in treating medical conditions; interactions with drugs, other supplements, and foods; and other safety concerns.

“Quality Supplements”

United States Pharmacopeial Convention (a nongovernmental, nonprofit organization)
NOTE:  The FDA does no ingredient or safety testing before a supplement enters the market. If you see “USP Verified Mark” on the packaging of a supplement, the product has been tested by an independent, nongovernmental lab and found to contain the indicated amount of the listed ingredients, contain safe levels of any impurities, and be in a form which can be readily absorbed. However, it does not indicate that the listed ingredients are safe or effective.

“Vitamins & Supplements”

Consumer Reports

Focused drug & supplement sites

AIDSinfo Drug Database

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

“Drug Disposal Locator Tool”

NABP | National Association of Boards of Pharmacy
Locate a nearby collection site. If none is unavailable, learn the next-best option for disposal.

“LactMed”

In ToxNet, from National Library of Medicine
For nursing mothers, safety information about drugs & other chemicals.

“MedWatch Voluntary Report”

FDA | U.S. Food & Drug Administration
Notify the FDA if you have had an adverse event (serious drug side effect, product use error, product quality problem, or therapeutic failure) related to a medical product (medication, supplement, medical device, etc.), cosmetic, or food/beverage. Report problems with vaccines elsewhere.

“Needles and Other Sharps (Safe Disposal Outside of Health Care Settings)”

FDA | U.S. Food & Drug Administration
Information continues via “More” box near bottom of introductory page.

Pillbox

National Library of Medicine
This tool for identifying mystery medications has information on over 32,000 FDA-approved prescription and over-the-counter drugs that are taken orally as pills. Images of over 8,000 pills are included. Liquids, creams, suppositories, & patches are not included.